The final words on clutter. We finish with more tips and parting words of encouragement. If this isn’t enough, hire an expert. It will be worth it if you’re buried that deep. Less chaos, I promise. If you missed part 2, here is the link.

From The Happiness Project.com, Gretchen Rubin asks if you you find yourself repeating these phrases to justify keeping items you don’t use or don’t even particularly like. (Hint, yes responses indicate a high toss-ability factor.)

  • I might need this someday.
  • It’s so useful.
  • I’ll eventually find a way to use it.
  • I can’t throw it away but I don’t know how to get it to someone who would want it.
  • It was a gift so I need to keep it out of respect.
  • This will be a collector’s item someday. (Generally, not likely.)
  • I never had this as a child so I want it as an adult.
  • The more stuff I have the more I can pass on to my family.
  • Going through stuff stirs up emotions and I can’t handle it right now.
  • I don’t have the time or energy to sort and figure out what to keep.
  • I’ve had this for so long I can’t give it up.
  • I forgot I even had this.

Who uses shot glasses? We do, so these are keepers. Do yours have three layers of dust? Give away.

Vanessa hayes from getsimplified.com uses these: 

• Do I love it?
• Do I need it?
• Do I use it?
• When was the last time I used it?
• When do I plan on using it?
• Can I borrow it?
• Can I rent it?
• What’s the worst that will happen if I get rid of it?
Marla Stone from I-Deal-Lifestyle offers these valuable organization tips:
  • Have a plan and pace yourself. Take everything out of the space you want to organize and start with a blank slate. How do you want the space to feel, function and look and organize accordingly.
  • Get rid of items you don’t want. You either want it or you don’t.
  • Categorize similar items like sunglasses, keys and mail, etc., and always put them in a designated spot.
  • Watch for freebies. A mug, t-shirt, hand-me-down’s, magnets, etc. If you don’t need it or don’t love it, don’t take it.
  • And, one of my personal golden rules. Always put things back from where you took them. That tip alone is worthy of the happy dance.
In conclusion, if you’re in the middle of a huge change (for the better or not so much) and you’re emotionally and physically drained, postpone or try taking small steps. Schedule an hour a week and tackle one small area. Even the smallest of purge, toss, donate or giveaway will be beneficial.                                                                                                               
Interior design expert William Morris sums it up this way.  “Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful.” You can make that happen. De-clutter, de-chaos and free yourself from the extra weight.